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Books for Kids about Epilepsy

It is estimated that more than half a million children are diagnosed with epilepsy in America. It is unknown how many kids have epilepsy globally, but according to the World Health Organization, about 50 million people in the world have epilepsy, making it one of the most common neurological disorders. While treatment options vary in variety (learn more about keto for epilepsy here!) and effectiveness, there isn’t a known cure.

Below you’ll find kid-friendly stories to explain what seizures are, how epilepsy is diagnosed, what happens to the body during a seizure, and how medication can help. Some of these books also include how to care for a child during a seizure, both physically and emotionally. For more great finds, don’t miss our other Rare Parenting Book Lists!

Lee: The Rabbit with Epilepsy features a young rabbit on a diagnostic journey. When Lee is diagnosed with absence seizures, she worries about how her life will change. Soon after, Lee receives medication to help control her seizures. She learns that with medication to help her, she can still laugh and play like before.

Recommended for ages 3+

In Sometimes I Get the Wiggles, Kannon feels anxious that his seizures might scare his classmates at school. To overcome his anxiety, Kannon decides to train his classmates and his teacher to become “Seizure Heroes,” so they can assist him if he experiences the “wiggles.”

Recommended for ages 6-12

In Super B Battles a Seizure, Bentley pretends to be a superhero, “Super B,” each time he visits the hospital. Becoming a superhero helps him feel strong and brave during blood draws and IVs. Superhero Bentley also uses art therapy and special protein drinks as extra superpowers to help him through his hospital stays.

Recommended for ages 3-8

In The Great Katie Kate Explains Epilepsy, Jimmy visits a neurologist’s office where he is diagnosed with epilepsy. When he is with the other patients, Superhero Katie Kate appears to ease their worries. As they ask questions about what happens to their bodies, how epilepsy affects their brains, and how to live safely with epilepsy, the “Worry Wombat” disappears.

Recommended for ages 3+

In What is Epilepsy? narrator Effie deep dives into epilepsy. Effie explores what epilepsy is, why it happens, what treatments are available, and how you can help if you see someone having a seizure. This book is very easy to follow for elementary-aged and older kids alike.

Recommended for ages 4+

Evie, Eddie and the EEG is a sibling story about two little mice. Eddie is scheduled for his first EEG and is a bit nervous. His little sister, Evie, who is experienced with EEGs, coaches him through the process. She explains what electrodes are, how they are placed, what they measure, and how they are removed. Understanding the specifics eases Eddie’s anxiety.

Recommended for ages 4+

I Have Epilepsy follows Kassie, a young girl who has both absence and tonic-clonic seizures, referred to in their previous terms of petit mal and grand mal seizures. She explains the difference between what happens to her body with each seizure type. Her family keeps her safe during a seizure by turning Kassie on her side and putting a soft pillow under her head.

Recommended for ages 3-8

Did You Know that I Have Epilepsy? follows the story of Cody, who shares the physical warning signs he experiences before a seizure is about to happen. He takes readers through some of his seizure triggers, such as blinking lights, periods of low blood sugar, and when he has a fever.

Recommended for ages 3-6

Becky the Brave is a sibling story about epilepsy. The older sister, Becky, teaches her younger sister, Sarah, how to be brave about big dogs and starting a new school. Then, one day, Becky has a seizure at school. Luckily Sarah learned some tips, and it becomes her turn to be brave for her big sister.

Recommended for ages 4-9

Let’s Learn with Teddy about Epilepsy covers the various stages of an epilepsy diagnosis. We join Teddy’s visits with a neurologist when he is diagnosed and when he undergoes EEG and MRI exams. Teddy also teaches us the importance of taking medication to help control and prevent future seizures.

Recommended for ages 3-10

In Zeeba and the Seizure, Zeeba and her classmates take an unexpected trip to the hospital after Zeeba collapses and starts shaking. At the hospital, Zeeba and her friends learn that what happened is called a seizure, and that Zeeba has epilepsy. Throughout the story, Zeeba’s friends are supportive and caring. They want to learn more about how they can help their friend the next time she has a seizure.

Recommended for ages 3-10

Char Bear Keeps Dancing is about a little bear who has infantile spasms, a form of epileptic seizures. Char Bear loves to dance, but sometimes her body “shimmies” involuntarily. The story takes the readers to a doctor’s visit where an EEG exam reveals that her shimmies are infantile spasms. Char Bear learns about infantile spasms and about the importance of medication and continued checkups.

Recommended for ages 3-10

When The Little Ninja first experiences his absence seizures, he worries that he can no longer be a ninja. However, as he learns more about his seizures, he begins to view his diagnosis as his secret ninja power. Epilepsy means he has extra electricity running through his brain, and with special medicine, he can chase the electricity away. 

Recommended for ages 4-7

In The Abilities in Me: Epilepsy, a young boy takes us to his routine hospital checkup and EEG exam, where explains symptoms and types of seizures. He also highlights how children are kind to him, because they ask questions, want to learn more about epilepsy, and are patient when he has a seizure.

Recommended for ages 3-10

In Taking Seizure Disorders to School, Jaime explains warning signs a seizure may happen, the importance of wearing a medical bracelet, what it feels like to have a seizure, and what happens at medical checkups. The back of the book includes a quiz for readers to test their knowledge about seizures.

Recommended for ages 3-10


References

Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Epilepsy Fast Facts

World Health Organization, February 2023, Epilepsy

Disclosure: Occasionally, we include links to recommended products. When you purchase a product through a link, we may earn a small percentage of the sale, at no cost to you. These sales contribute to the operation of our site, and help to keep content free to read.

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